College of Pharmacy
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Welcome to the MCP NMR Facility

The NMR facility, located in room B71 in the College of Pharmacy building, serves more than 150 research graduate students and post-doctoral associates from the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy.

Presently, the NMR facility houses two (2) high-resolution NMR spectrometers:

  1. 400 MHz Bruker AVIII HD NMR spectrometer equipped with a 5 mm room temperature SmartProbe™ (Brodaband observe probe with improved sensitivity on both 1H and the broadband channel). SmartProbe™ features ATM (auto frequency tune and match module). Most of the NMR experiment run on this instrument, including gradient selected 2D experiments and selective 1D experiments, can be run in a manual or semi-automatic mode. This spectrometer configuration is capable of operating at variable temperatures in the range of -150°C to + 150°C. The host computer (PC) is currently running latest TopSpin acquisition and processing software (v3.5).
  2. 400 MHz Bruker AV III spectrometer equipped with a room temperature 5 mm ATM (auto frequency tune and match) probe which allows automatic frequency tuning and impedance match on the decouple channel (1H) as well as the broad band (BB) observe channel (31P to 109Ag). Most of the NMR experiments run on this instrument, including gradient selected 2D experiments and selective 1D experiments, can be run in a manual or semi-automatic mode. This spectrometer configuration is capable of operating at variable temperatures in the range of -150°C to +150°C. There is also a cooling unit (BCU-05) attached to the probe that allows routine temperature regulation down to +5°C. The host computer (PC) is currently running latest TopSpin acquisition and processing software (v3.5).
    This instrument is also equipped with an auto-sampler (BACS) which allows unattended operation of up to 60 samples.

The AVANCE AVIII/AVIII HD consoles described above are both equipped with signal generators, gradient amplifiers and digital shaped pulse generators for selective excitation, capable of executing most of the new pulse sequences published in the literature.